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Saints Feast Family
~Exploring Catholic Patron Saints of the Day & their Feasts (Catholic Cuisine)
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Psychosabvatos (Orthodox)
The Saturday before All Souls 

Psychosabvatos


Saturday, before Sunday, is called - "Saturday of the Souls" or "Psychosabvatos". It is the first of the two Psychedelics of the Year (the second being performed on Saturday before Sunday Pentecost).

The reason why our Church established it, although every Saturday is devoted to the rest of the people, is this: Because many people died from time to time in small or in foreign lands or in the sea or in the mountains and the flags or some, because of poverty, of the ordained memoirs, "the divine Fathers who have been charitable, have established this memorial in favor of all the everlasting Christians of the eternity."

Because on Sunday of the Apocrypha we have a memory of the Second Coming of Christ, and our sleepless ones have not yet been judged, we are remembered today and, invoking the infinite mercy of God, we ask God with the memorial that we do to rest. At the same time, we also remember death and "we are excited to repentance ...".

http://www.saint.gr/101/saint.aspx

https://www.greekboston.com/religion/koliva/

 

Prayer:

 

Tradition:

Kolyva Greek Tradition

In the Gospel John, “Christ said, ‘Unless a wheat grain falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.’” (John 12:24)  As Orthodox Christians we are awaiting the 2nd Coming and the General Resurrection of the dead, through Christ we have Life!  But, remembering the memory of our deceased beloved ones is an opportunity to pray for the souls of the departed as well as a way to help us heal from the death.

 

Recipe:

Recipe for Koliva – Wheat Grain for Greek Orthodox Memorial Service

 

Koliva

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups wheat grain, shelled

  • 1 1/2 cups walnuts, coarsely chopped

  • 1 1/2 cups blanched almonds, lightly toasted

  • 3/4 cup golden raisins

  • 2 cups finely ground Zweiback, graham crackers, or paximadia

  • 2 cups powdered sugar

  • .5 tablespoon cinnamon

  • 1/2 cup sesame seeds lightly toasted

  • 1/2 cup pomegranate seeds (optional)

  • Almonds, powdered sugar, silver candies, walnuts or white raisins for decoration (optional)
     

How to Make Koliva:

  1. Wash the wheat thoroughly to get rid of any grit or sand. Add the wheat to a large pot. Fill the pot with water, add a few pinches of salt, and bring the water to a boil.

  2. Cook the wheat until it’s fluffy and tender – this should take about 20 minutes.

  3. Strain the wheat and let the water drain out thoroughly.

  4. Prepare a surface by layering some towels down. Spread the wheat thinly on the towels and allow drying overnight.

  5. Add the wheat, walnuts, almonds, raisins, sesame seeds, pomegranate seeds and 2 tablespoons of the ground toast/crackers to a large mixing bowl and stir well with a wooden spoon until all the ingredients are evenly distributed.

  6. Place the mixture in a tray or bowl that you would like to use. Press the mixture down to smooth it out and shape it (mound for tray or flat for bowl). Sprinkle some of the remaining toast/crackers on the top of the mixture to cover (no need to use all the crackers).

  7. Sprinkle the powdered sugar generously on top.

  8. Decorate the top with any of the ingredients you choose. It is traditional to adorn the top with a cross.