July 30

Saint of the day:
Saint Leopold Mandić

Patron Saint of Cancer sufferers

Saint Leopold Mandic’s Story

Western Christians who are working for greater dialogue with Orthodox Christians may be reaping the fruits of Father Leopold’s prayers.

A native of Croatia, Leopold joined the Capuchin Franciscans and was ordained several years later in spite of several health problems. He could not speak loudly enough to preach publicly. For many years he also suffered from severe arthritis, poor eyesight, and a stomach ailment.

For several years Leopold taught patrology, the study of the Church Fathers, to the clerics of his province, but he is best known for his work in the confessional, where he sometimes spent 13-15 hours a day. Several bishops sought out his spiritual advice.

Leopold’s dream was to go to the Orthodox Christians and work for the reunion of Roman Catholicism and Orthodoxy. His health never permitted it. Leopold often renewed his vow to go to the Eastern Christians; the cause of unity was constantly in his prayers.

At a time when Pope Pius XII said that the greatest sin of our time is “to have lost all sense of sin,” Leopold had a profound sense of sin and an even firmer sense of God’s grace awaiting human cooperation.

Leopold, who lived most of his life in Padua, died on July 30, 1942, and was canonized in 1982. In the Roman liturgy his feast is celebrated on July 30.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_Mandi%C4%87

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-of-the-day/saint-leopold-mandic

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Prayer

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Visit

Shrine of Saint Leopold Mandić, Padua, Italy

Piazzale Santa Croce, 44, 35123 Padova PD, Italy

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Recipe

 

Shrimp alla Buzara

Ingredients

  • 24 large raw shrimp

  • 8 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

  • 3 plump garlic cloves

  • 1/2 c. finely chopped shallots

  • 1 tsp. coarse sea salt or kosher salt

  • 1 c. white wine

  • 1 tbsp. tomato paste

  • 1 c. water

  • Freshly ground black pepper

  • 4 tbsp. bread crumbs

  • 2 tbsp. chopped fresh Italian parsley

Directions

  1. Remove all of the shell except the tail, remove the vein (digestive tract) that runs inside the curving back of each shrimp: Slice open the back with a sturdy sharp paring knife, cutting through the shell, and scrape out the vein. Rinse the shrimp and pat dry.

  2. Pour 1/4 cup of the olive oil in the sauté pan and set over medium-high heat. Scatter in the garlic, cook until sizzling, then stir in the shallots. When they’re sizzling, stir in 1/4 teaspoon of the salt and 1/4 cup of the wine. Cook, stirring frequently, until the wine is nearly completely evaporated and the shallots have softened. Drop in the tomato paste and stir it around the pan for a minute, coating the shallots and caramelizing.

  3. Pour in the rest of the wine, bring to the boil quickly, then add the water and 1/4 teaspoon salt, stirring. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and let the sauce bubble gently and reduce for about 5 minutes while you sear the shrimp (see next step).

  4. In a wide skillet pour 2 tablespoons of olive oil and set over high heat until very hot. Scatter the shrimp in the pan, toss them in the oil, and season with 1/2 teaspoon salt. Cook for just a minute or slightly longer, until the shells are lightly colored and the flesh underneath is opaque, then turn off the heat.

  5. With the sauce still bubbling, slide in the seared shrimp and tumble to coat them all with sauce. Stir in the coarsely ground pepper, then the tablespoon bread crumbs — use more crumbs if the sauce is thin. Cook for another 2 minutes then turn off the heat.

  6. Drizzle over the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil — or more to taste — and incorporate it well, tumbling the shrimp in the pan. Sprinkle the parsley on top and serve immediately.

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