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Saints Feast Family
~Exploring Catholic Patron Saints of the Day & their Feasts (Catholic Cuisine)
(Find food, recipes, traditions, locations, relics, prayers, songs, book, movies, art, products, crafts & more!)

March 4 

Saint of the day:

Saint Casimir


Patron Saint of Poland and Lithuania

Saint Casimir’s Story
 

Casimir, born of kings and in line to be a king himself, was filled with exceptional values and learning by a great teacher, John Dlugosz. Even his critics could not say that his conscientious objection indicated softness. As a teenager, Casimir lived a highly disciplined, even severe life, sleeping on the ground, spending a great part of the night in prayer and dedicating himself to lifelong celibacy.
 

When nobles in Hungary became dissatisfied with their king, they prevailed upon Casimir’s father, the king of Poland, to send his son to take over the country. Casimir obeyed his father, as many young men over the centuries have obeyed their governments. The army he was supposed to lead was clearly outnumbered by the “enemy”; some of his troops were deserting because they were not paid. At the advice of his officers, Casimir decided to return home.
 

His father was irked at the failure of his plans, and confined his 15-year-old son for three months. The lad made up his mind never again to become involved in the wars of his day, and no amount of persuasion could change his mind. He returned to prayer and study, maintaining his decision to remain celibate even under pressure to marry the emperor’s daughter.
 

He reigned briefly as king of Poland during his father’s absence. He died of lung trouble at 25 while visiting Lithuania, of which he was also Grand Duke. He was buried in Vilnius, Lithuania.


https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-casimir/
http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=33
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Casimir

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St._Casimir,_Vilnius

http://www.vilnius-tourism.lt/fr/voir/lieux-a-visiter/eglises/eglise-saint-casimir/
https://www.slideshare.net/juji30/etwinning-project-twinkle-and-smile-spring-book-lithuania
http://www.visitlithuania.net/index.php/events/108-other-events/349-st-casimirs-fair-weekend
https://www.15min.lt/en/article/culture-society/theatrical-procession-revives-traditions-of-400-year-old-kaziukas-fair-528-200482

 

Hymn:

Daily, Daily Sing to Mary or St. Casimir song

Prince Casimir chose a life of celibacy and asceticism.
He died at the age of twenty-six from tuberculosis, on March 4, 1484.
He was buried in the cathedral at Vilna (now Vilnius, Lithuania).
When in 1604 his tomb was opened for translation to the church that Sigismund III
built in his name, his body was found to be fresh and whole. He was holding this prayer to the Virgin in his hands

 

 

 

Prayer:


Every day, O my soul, pay your respects to Mary, 
Make her feasts solemn and celebrate her brilliant virtues; 
Contemplate and admire her elevation; 
Proclaim her blessedness both as Mother and Virgin; 
Honor her so that she delivers you from the weight of your sins; 
Invoke her so as not to be driven by the torrent of passion; 
I do know if anybody can honor Our Lady worthily 
Yet he who keeps silent in her praises is senseless; 
Everyone should exalt and love her in a special way, 
And never cease to cherish and pray to her; 
O Mary, the honor and glory of all women, 
You who God has raised above all creatures; 
O Virgin of Mercy, hear the prayers of those who never stop praising you; 
Purify those who are guilty and make them worthy of heaven; 
Hail, O holy Virgin, through whom the gates of heaven were opened to undeserving souls 
You, who, the old serpent's snares never managed to seduce; 
You repair and console despairing souls 
Preserve us from the evils that will fall on the wicked; 
Obtain perpetual peace for me, 
And save me from the misfortune of the flames of Gehenna; 
Obtain for me to be chaste and modest, gentle, kind, sober, pious, prudent, upright and the enemy of all falsehood; 
Grant me meekness, love of harmony and purity; 
Make me strong and constant on the path of righteousness.

Visit:
 

Vilnius Cathedral

Cathedral Square

01122 Vilnius, Lithuania

*St Casimir was greatly beloved by the faithful in his country.
If not for his early death at the age of twenty-five he would have become the King of Poland.
He is remembered in particular for his exceptional piety and humility.
His remains now rest in Vilnius, Lithuania and are placed within a silver sarcophagus in this church.

 

Tradition:

In Lithuania March 4th is not only St. Casimir's Day but a national holiday!!!

 

 

 
For the celebration of St. Casimir's Day on March 4th, many pilgrims came to Vilnius from various Lithuanian places. After services in the cathedral, the people lingered for a while. This gave rise to the so-called Kaziuko muge (Casimir's Fair). Thousands of sellers, buyers and visitors came to these fairs. They were held outdoors. The most typical Kaziuko muge merchandise was Vilniaus verbos. These are various dried flowers and grasses braided together into Typical Lithuanian designs and tied to short sticks; they are taken to church on Palm Sunday and later used to decorate the home.

Another typical Kaziuko muge product or muginukas, was a heart- shaped Honey cookie, decorated with colored sugar flowers, zig-zags, dots and birds. Popular men's and women's names were written on the cookies. People bought and gave them to selected loved ones. It was a custom to bring some back for anyone who had to remain home.

For Lithuanians, March 4th is not only St. Casimir's Day but a national holiday as well. When it is commemorated at home, the family can discuss this popular Lithuanian saint, his miracles, life and piety. For every member of the family a muginukas can be baked with the name inscribed on a heart-shaped cookie decorated with colored sugar designs. The cookies can be baked out of gingerbread dough or the recipes included here.
 


“Kaziuko širdis“ (Heart of Kaziukas) Cookies
Spring time means love is in the air!
Give your loved one a heart cookie!

Gingerbread

 

  • 500 g of AP flour 

  • 100 g of butter

  • 200 g of sugar 

  • 200 g of honey 

  • 2 eggs whipped 

  • 1 teaspoon Baking powder 

  • 1-2 teaspoons Spice Mixture: ground cinnamon, cloves, cardamom
     

Directions:

  1. Add the butter, honey and sugar to the pot and heat until the butter

    dissolves and the mass becomes homogeneous. 

  2. Let the the sugar cool in the mixer while it is beating,

    once it has add the eggs one at a time.

  3. Mix and add flour with baking powder and spices. 

  4. Mix the dough and let it cool for at least a couple of hours. 

  5. You can make it from the evening, or even a few days ago,

    as it was for us this time:

  6. I made the dough on a Thursday evening and cooked only today. 

  7. about 3-4 mm in thickness, and we cut the figurines with molds. 

  8. The grapefruit (I'm rummaging a piece, not at all right away, since

    about 5 pieces of beetle comes out of this amount),

  9. We bring in a baking sheet, baked with baking paper and baked in a

    200-degree oven for about 7-8 minutes. or until it's browned

400 year old Lithuanian folk arts and crafts fair!!
 

Kaziuko mugė (English: Kaziukas Fair) is a large annual Lithuanian folk arts and crafts fair dating to the beginning of the 17th century.

It was originally held at the two main markets in Vilnius, Lithuania, as well as in the city streets.

The fair is traditionally held on the Sunday nearest to St. Casimir’s Day, March 4, ( this year Kaziuko fair will be held 5 - 7 March) the day Saint Casimir Jagiellon died. In Lithuanian, Kaziuko mugė means “Little Casimir’s” Fair (Kaziukas is a diminutive of Casimir).
 

Today, Kaziukas fair also features music and dance; it attracts tens of thousands of visitors and many craftsmen from all over the country as well as from neighboring states such as Latvia, Russia, and Poland. The pavilions of the fair occupy streets and squares in the Old Town of Vilnius.

The arts and crafts at the fair include hand-made goods from local craftsmen, such as apparel, knitted clothes, footwear, toys, utensils, metal crafting, souvenirs, and paintings. Foodstuffs such as rye bread, bagels, honey cookies, meat and diary products, natural honey, beer, and kvass are sold as well. Traditional “palm” bouquets (called “verbos”, hence Verbų sekmadienis) are one of the fair’s specialties. Made of colorful dried flowers and herbs, they are taken to churches on Palm Sunday. The shape of the “palms” resembles a lily, a flower with which St. Casimir is traditionally portrayed. Another popular product at the fair is the “muginukas”, an often heart-shaped honey cookie, decorated with colored sugar flowers, zigzags, dots, and birds. Popular men’s and women’s names are written on the cookies. People buy them to give to their loved ones. It is a custom to bring some back for anyone who had to remain at home.
 

Folklore dances and songs, all weekend of joy and merriment. From knick knacks to a real value bargains….come and check it out by yourself !
For the celebration of St. Casimir's Day on March 4th, many pilgrims came to Vilnius from various Lithuanian places. After services in the cathedral, the people lingered for a while. This gave rise to the so-called Kaziuko muge (Casimir's Fair). Thousands of sellers, buyers and visitors came to these fairs. They were held outdoors. The most typical Kaziuko muge merchandise was Vilniaus verbos. These are various dried flowers and grasses braided together into Typical Lithuanian designs and tied to short sticks; they are taken to church on Palm Sunday and later used to decorate the home.


 

The star of the fair, St Casimir 

Instead of a key to the city,
how about a pair of felt booties?

If you watched the video you might see Spiders...

There is a Legend of the Christmas Spider!
In Lithuania, Poland, and the Ukraine, finding a spider or a spider's web on a Christmas tree is considered good luck. ...

They also decorate Christmas trees with artificial spider webs.

The tradition of using tinsel is also said to be because of this story.

I guess spiders are welcomed all year!