• Black Twitter Icon
  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Pinterest Icon
  • Black YouTube Icon

Saints Feast Family
~Exploring Catholic Patron Saints of the Day & their Feasts (Catholic Cuisine)
(Find food, recipes, traditions, locations, relics, prayers, songs, book, movies, art, products, crafts & more!)

September 27

Saint of the day:

Saint Vincent de Paul

Saint Vincent de Paul’s Story

The deathbed confession of a dying servant opened Vincent de Paul’s eyes to the crying spiritual needs of the peasantry of France. This seems to have been a crucial moment in the life of the man from a small farm in Gascony, France, who had become a priest with little more ambition than to have a comfortable life.

The Countess de Gondi–whose servant he had helped–persuaded her husband to endow and support a group of able and zealous missionaries who would work among poor tenant farmers and country people in general. Vincent was too humble to accept leadership at first, but after working for some time in Paris among imprisoned galley slaves, he returned to be the leader of what is now known as the Congregation of the Mission, or the Vincentians. These priests, with vows of poverty, chastity, obedience, and stability, were to devote themselves entirely to the people in smaller towns and villages.

Later, Vincent established confraternities of charity for the spiritual and physical relief of the poor and sick of each parish. From these, with the help of Saint Louise de Marillac, came the Daughters of Charity, “whose convent is the sickroom, whose chapel is the parish church, whose cloister is the streets of the city.” He organized the rich women of Paris to collect funds for his missionary projects, founded several hospitals, collected relief funds for the victims of war, and ransomed over 1,200 galley slaves from North Africa. He was zealous in conducting retreats for clergy at a time when there was great laxity, abuse, and ignorance among them. He was a pioneer in clerical training and was instrumental in establishing seminaries.

Most remarkably, Vincent was by temperament a very irascible person—even his friends admitted it. He said that except for the grace of God he would have been “hard and repulsive, rough and cross.” But he became a tender and affectionate man, very sensitive to the needs of others.

Pope Leo XIII made him the patron of all charitable societies. Outstanding among these, of course, is the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, founded in 1833 by his admirer Blessed Frédéric Ozanam.

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-vincent-de-paul/

http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=326

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_de_Paul

 

Prayer:

 

Visit:

 

St Vincent de Paul

(d. 1660, Paris, France) (Relics: Paris, France)

Chapelle des Pères Lazaristes

(Chapel of the Vincentian Priests)

95 Rue de Sèvres

75006 Paris, France

*This church is very near the Vaneau Metro Stop.

The body of St Vincent de Paul rests above the main sanctuary and is accessed by means of a staircase.

 

La Chapelle Notre Dame de la Médaille Miraculeuse

(Chapel of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal)

140 Rue du Bac

75006 Paris, France

*The body of St Catherine Laboure is enshrined within this church. This is also the church where she had the visions of the Miraculous Medal.

*Also the heart of St Vincent de Paul is preserved within a reliquary at this shrine.


 

Churches of Honor in Rome

 

San Silvestro al Quirinale

(Saint Sylvester at the Quirinale)

Via Ventiquattro (XXIV) Maggio 10

Rome, Italy

*This church is east of Piazza Venezia. It is served by the Missionaries of St Vincent de Paul. A painting of their patron saint is in the main sanctuary.

It is not open often.

 

 

 

Recipes:
 

We are celebrating with French comfort recipes because our Saint was from France.

 

Rustic Roast Duck with New Potatoes, Sugar Snaps, and Spring Onions Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds Jersey Royal potatoes, or other small boiling potatoes, sliced in thirds

  • 1/2 pound sugar snap peas

  • 7 scallions, trimmed and cut in thirds

  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus 1 teaspoon

  • 2 duck legs, thighs attached

  • Herbes de Provence

  • Salt and pepper

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

  2. Prepare the vegetables by slicing the potatoes and scallions into thirds. In a roasting pan, toss together the potatoes with the fresh thyme, 1 scant tablespoon olive oil, and salt and pepper. Put into the oven to begin softening.

  3. Meanwhile, prepare the duck. Trim the duck of any excess fat, and reserve. Rub both duck legs with 1 teaspoon of olive oil total, just to give it a light coating.

  4. Sprinkle the duck liberally on both sides with herbes de Provence, and season well with salt and pepper.

  5. Heat a sauté pan on medium-high heat, and add in the reserved duck fat so that it begins to render. Place the duck legs skin side down into the hot pan, and sear just about 4 minutes until the skin is nice and golden. Flip the duck, and sear another minute.

  6. Open the oven, and toss the scallions and sugar snap peas in with the potatoes, coating the green vegetables with the seasoned potato oil. Place the duck legs skin side up on the bed of vegetables, and roast for 30-35 minutes, or just until the juices run clear. Garnish with stems of fresh thyme.


Rustic Apple Tart
Ingredients

 

For the Crust

  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, spooned and leveled

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar

  • 1-1/2 sticks (12 tablespoons) very cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

  • 1/4 cup very cold water
     

For the Filling

  • 1-3/4 lbs baking apples (3 large)

  • 1/3 cup sugar

  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
     

For Assembling & Baking

  • 1 tablespoon all purpose flour

  • 1 egg, beaten

  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar

  • 1 tablespoon apricot jelly or jam, optional for glaze

Directions:

  1. Make the crust: Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a food processor fitted with the steel blade, combine the flour, salt and sugar. Pulse briefly to combine. Add the cold butter and process just until the butter is the size of peas, about 5 seconds. Sprinkle the ice water over the mixture and process just until moistened and very crumbly, about 5 seconds. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and knead a few times, just until it comes together into a cohesive ball. Pat the dough into a disk. Flour your work surface again and dust the dough with flour, as well. Using a rolling pin, roll into a circle 8 to 10 inches in diameter, turning and adding more flour as necessary so the dough doesn’t stick. Transfer the dough to the parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate while you prepare the filling (you’ll roll the dough out further on the parchment paper so go ahead and clean your work surface).

  2. Make the Filling: Peel, core, and cut the apples into 1/8-inch-thick slices (you should have about 4 cups) and place in a large bowl. Add the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, melted butter, and salt; toss to combine.

  3. Take the dough from the fridge and slide the parchment paper onto the countertop. Roll the dough, directly on the parchment paper, into a 14-inch circle about 1/8 inch thick. It’s fine if the edges are a little ragged. Place the parchment and dough back on the baking sheet – the pastry should curve up the sides of the pan.

  4. Assemble the tart: Sprinkle the flour evenly over the pastry. Arrange the apple slices on top in overlapping concentric circles to within 3 inches of the edge. Don’t worry about making it look perfect! It doesn’t make much difference in the end and you don’t want the dough to get too warm. Fold the edges of the dough over the apples in a free-form fashion, working your way around and creating pleats as you go. Patch up any tears by pinching a bit of dough from the edge.

  5. Using a pastry brush, brush the pleated dough evenly with the beaten egg. Sprinkle half of the turbinado sugar over the top crust and half over the fruit. Chill the assembled tart in the fridge for 15 to 20 minutes.

  6. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°F and set an oven rack in the center position.

  7. Bake for 55 to 65 minutes, or until the apples are tender and the crust is golden and cooked through. (It’s okay if some of the juices leak from the tart onto the pan. The juices will burn on the pan but the tart should be fine -- just scrape any burnt bits away from the tart once it’s baked.) Transfer the pan to a rack and let cool.

  8. While the tart cools, make the optional glaze. In a small bowl, mix the apricot jam with 1-1/2 teaspoons water. Heat in the microwave until bubbling, about 20 seconds. Using a pastry brush, brush the apples with the apricot syrup.

  9. Use two large spatulas to transfer the tart to a serving plate or cutting board. Slice and serve warm or at room temperature. The tart is best served on the day it is made, but leftovers will keep, loosely covered on the countertop, for a few days.

  10. Make Ahead: The dough can be made up to 3 days in advance and refrigerated. Allow it to sit at room temperature for about 15 minutes before rolling, or until pliable. The assembled tart may be frozen for up to 3 months. To freeze, place the baking sheet in the freezer until the tart is frozen, then wrap tightly. Bake directly from the freezer.